Post Tagged with: "weekend reading"

Queer STS: Part 2

Queer STS: Part 2

 This is a two-part blog post, the first part focusing on provocations, and the second on assembling a “reading list” for STS students interested in queer studies. Jose Esteban Muñoz passed away today, and these posts are inspired by his work.      Start Here, Then Iterate: An STS student interested in the theme of “Queer STS” might start by reading Catharina Landstrom’s critique of Feminist STS, “Queering Feminist Technology Studies” (2007). Landstrom critiques the heteronormativity of feminist constructivist technology studies, which she argues reinforces gendered binaries in its focus on masculinist regimes and assumption of what qualifies as masculine. Her main […]

Photo from The Commons archive at Flickr here.

Weekend Reading

James Scott reviews Jared Diamond’s latest in the LRB.  [Via Savage Minds.] Kevin Drum  on the debate between economists about why fiscal stimulus works.  How is New Keynesianism different from Old Keynesianism? Using Google Docs in the higher education classroom. On meta-games and containers.  (You should definitely click on this!) An essay on academics hired by Wall Street published in The Nation. Upworthy is just the new mutation of the Internet Chain Letter. Have a good weekend!      

Weekend Reading

This weekend is the HASTS 25th anniversary.  But just in case, you have time, some interesting links to browse through on the weekend. Historian David A. Bell asks if global history can be done better, without over-using the “network” metaphor. Susan Faludi on “Facebook feminism” and the Lean In movement. Annette Markham writes about what it means to do ethnography online. An interesting article, with results from a group of MIT neuro-scientists about how we perceive subway maps. Post in the comments if you love/hate any of them.

Is “open source” in 2011 different from what it was in 2001?

Is “open source” in 2011 different from what it was in 2001?

HASTS alum Chris Kelty has a nice “Afterword“[pdf] for a new special issue of the journal Criticism titled “Open Source Culture and Aesthetics.”  His key point is that while discussing “open source software,” it needs to be studied as something concrete, not just an instantiation of some wider cultural phenomenon.  Thus, he suggests, “open source” means something very different today than it did in 2001: There are concrete, empirically specifiable, and material realities to open source and the rush to replace them with a label like peer productioncan only obscure that there is something called open source software production, that […]