Post Tagged with: "the image series"

The Image Series: Link Rot, Guantánamo, and the Department of Defense

The Image Series: Link Rot, Guantánamo, and the Department of Defense

A Beinecke Scholar and former Turkey Fulbrighter, Muira McCammon (@muira_mccammon) has written about Guantánamo for Slate’s Future Tense, The Kenyon Review Online and a few other publications. She will soon graduate from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst with an M.A. in Comparative Literature/Translation Studies and received her B.A. in International Relations and French from Carleton College. Her thesis probes the stories that have been told about the Guantánamo Bay Detainee Library. Muira enjoys talking to the journalists, artists, veterans, lawyers, and others whose paths have intersected with GiTMO. She also works part-time for the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society. […]

The Image Series: Open Wombs

The Image Series: Open Wombs

The Image Series invites HASTS affiliates and guest authors to write freely about one image relevant to their work.  To contribute to this set, contact Lan Li at lanli@mit.edu. The image above was found with other anonymous, anatomical illustrations, at the end of an eighteenth-century manuscript of Tibb-i-Akbar. Though the illustrations seem to be separate from the Tibb-e-Akbar, the text itself was written in Persian in 1700 by Muhammad Muqim Arzani, a Sufi physician from Gilan. When examining this anonymous, anatomical illustration, found appended to a manuscript of the Persian medical text Tibb-i-Akbar (1700), we see a woman holding open a flap of skin, inviting the reader to […]

The Image Series: Aveling and the Politics of Transfusion

The Image Series: Aveling and the Politics of Transfusion

The Image Series invites HASTS affiliates and guest authors to write freely about one image relevant to their work.  To contribute to this set, contact Lan Li at lanli@mit.edu. J. H. Aveling, `Immediate transfusion in England’, Obstetrics Journal, 1873, 1, 303. positions of patient and blood donor. Wellcome Library, London. In 1873, James Aveling proposed the first apparatus for immediate transfusion, a blood transfusion procedure characterized by the direct connection between donor and patient. Theoretically, immediate transfusion aimed to circumvent the problem of coagulation or blood clotting thought to be caused by the blood’s contact with the air. Aveling promoted his technological […]

The Image Series: Crania Americana

The Image Series: Crania Americana

James Poskett is an historian of science, race and print at the University of Cambridge. He is the current holder of the Adrian Research Fellowship at Darwin College where he is completing his first book on the global history of phrenology.  ‘Pawnee’, Plate 38, Samuel George Morton, Crania Americana (Philadelphia, 1839) Crania Americana is a disturbing book. Published in the winter of 1839, it features seventy-eight lithographic plates of Native North and South American skulls. The mastermind behind this grim project was the Philadelphia physician Samuel George Morton. Today, Morton is most often remembered as the founder of a distinctive ‘American […]

The Image Series: 12 Meridians

The Image Series: 12 Meridians

The Image Series features HASTS students and guest authors who are invited to freely write about one image relevant to their work.  This is the first in a set of curated posts on the HASTS Blog.  To contribute to this series, contact Lan Li at lanli@mit.edu “The relationship among the avenues of the 12 jingmai (meridians)” Wang Xuetai, Acu-Moxa Handbook [Zhenjiu Shouce] 1966, p 58 It may not look like it, but the diagram above is a map of the body.   We usually think of body maps as ideal types (in the Ian Hacking sense), like anatomical atlases, but the map above illustrates physiology.  Or, […]

The Image Series: An Introduction

The Image Series: An Introduction

Lord Rothschild on a Giant Tortoise When my sister and I were growing up in the urban jungle of LA, Sundays meant waking up to the gentle thump of the thicker, fuller, denser version of the Los Angeles Times landing at our doorstep.  This was exciting. Not because we were worldly citizens at 8 and 10 years old, but because in the gentle thump contained the Sunday comics…in color!  COLOR!  Ok, color can sometimes be distracting (see chapter 8 of Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics: The Invisible Art), but at least the artists and editors took the time to add another dimension to their work. Which is why […]