Post Tagged with: "history of technology"

Engineering Taste: IBM’s Chef Watson and Technologies of Heteromation

Engineering Taste: IBM’s Chef Watson and Technologies of Heteromation

In the documentary El Bulli: Cooking in Progress, Chef Ferran Adria can be seen painstakingly testing new flavors and recipes for the now-shuttered El Bulli restaurant. The menu theme is “water, ” and over the course of weeks, even months, single dishes are perfected with a new flavor addition, a sprinkling of green matcha powder here or an injection of mint-flavored sugar there. The recipes are always distinguished by Adria’s unique flair for new gastronomic devices and technologies. In the film we can see that Chef Adria’s process is a craft combing tacit taste and exacting discipline not uncommon among […]

Image credit: Nathan Ensmenger.

Nobro Computing

In a blog-post on Difference Engines week ago, Lilly Irani wrote: By analogy, maybe there’s a feminist STS project that could take similar form [to the People of Color in European Art History Tumblr that she'd been reading] . Women in computing advocates (e.g. Anita Borg Institute) often use the presence of women in computing history as the exception that proves the possibility. I’ve been frustrated for a while about the way well-meaning computing institutions deal with gender in computing by simply attempting to include women (future, present, and past) in the already gendered mold of the contemporary computer programmer. Here’s […]

A Theory of Key Points: What Tennis can tell us about Technological Change

A Theory of Key Points: What Tennis can tell us about Technological Change

One of the reasons for this blog is that it allows me to write speculative posts that no self-respecting journal would publish.  Consider this one of them.  I love watching tennis matches — and rewatching them on YouTube (typically when I have a deadline and I feel like doing anything but working on it).  And I often spend time thinking about technological determinism — or rather, how to avoid it in one’s work.  How can one tell stories of change without emphasizing the technological?  Or by folding the technological into the institutional?  It struck me once that telling a story […]