Articles by: Lan Angela Li

The Shanghai Sanatorium

The Shanghai Sanatorium

In 1949, my grandmother started working as a nurse at the largest sanatorium in Shanghai.  It had been founded by French Jesuit missionaries who were forced to abandon the city once the Republic of China dissolved.  My grandma had entered along with twenty other newly trained nurses to work with four doctors and care for eight hundred patients.  Yes, four doctors for eight hundred patients. Below is an excerpt of an interview I had with my grandma about her early years at the sanatorium. GM: When we first started working at the hospital, there were four types of patients.  But before the Liberation, they were all bound and tied up.  So, […]

The Proposal

The Proposal

Last week, I presented my dissertation proposal.   Like other presentations, visualizing the content helped to outline and organize my ideas.  Unlike other presentations, my ideas were significantly shifting day to day.  Throughout the semester, I cut off more than half of my potential sources and expanded on a smaller section that I had initially written about for my first year paper.  This decision happened on a night bus to New York.  A week before my presentation, I decided to frame the project as body maps and scrambled to find The Greatest Hits on visualization and representation.  Special thanks to Grace […]

MIT Symposium on Gender + Technology – Session 3: DATA

MIT Symposium on Gender + Technology – Session 3: DATA

Saturday, February 22, 2014  |   MIT Organized by Renée Blackburn and Mitali Thakor, doctoral candidates in the MIT Program in History, Anthropology, + STS.  Feminist theory in STS has critically engaged questions of scientific ideology, institutional power, difference, and epistemology –- attending not only to gender but also race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, ability, postcoloniality, queer theory, and more… “Gender Binaries and the Ideological Affordances of Data Activism” J. Nathan Matias, MIT Nathan has been trying to develop new algorithms to increase diversity online.  At the moment, he is dealing with gender binaries to show how women are still an underrepresented […]

MIT Symposium on Gender + Technology – KEYNOTE

MIT Symposium on Gender + Technology – KEYNOTE

Saturday, February 22, 2014  |   MIT 12:45-2:15PM – LUNCH + KEYNOTE Introductory Remarks: Michael M.J. Fischer, Professor of Anthropology and STS, MIT By way of introducing Kim Fortun, the featured keynote of MIT’s Gender and Technology Symposium, Michael Fischer talks about the ways in which feminist studies and poststructural feminist studies have influenced Kim’s work.  One method of analysis is playing with scale based on the first wave of feminist analysis, which focused on the role of women to give them recognition and voice.  By using the affordances of feminist post-structuralism, playing with scale can also shift the balance […]

MIT Symposium on Gender + Technology – Session 2: SEX + BODIES 

MIT Symposium on Gender + Technology – Session 2: SEX + BODIES 

Saturday, February 22, 2014  |   MIT Organized by Renée Blackburn and Mitali Thakor, doctoral candidates in the MIT Program in History, Anthropology, + STS.  Feminist theory in STS has critically engaged questions of scientific ideology, institutional power, difference, and epistemology –- attending not only to gender but also race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, ability, postcoloniality, queer theory, and more… 11:00AM-12:30PM – Session 2: SEX + BODIES  “Online Moral Economy of Sex Selection in Women’s Club, Turkey” Burcu Mutlu, MIT Burcu looks at the moral economy of sex selection in the anonymous women-only online forum known as the Women’s Club.  By analyzing 541 […]

MIT Symposium on Gender + Technology – Session 1: LABOR

MIT Symposium on Gender + Technology – Session 1: LABOR

Saturday, February 22, 2014  |   MIT Organized by Renée Blackburn and Mitali Thakor, doctoral candidates in the MIT Program in History, Anthropology, + STS.  Feminist theory in STS has critically engaged questions of scientific ideology, institutional power, difference, and epistemology –- attending not only to gender but also race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, ability, postcoloniality, queer theory, and more… 9:15-10:45 AM – Session 1: LABOR  “Who Was the User? Gender on the Personal Computing Frontier” Joy Rankin, Yale University “Careful attention to how user defined themselves and were defined by others illuminates the gendered ways of personal computing.” In this talk, Joy highlights […]

Exams, Generally

Exams, Generally

General exams are meant to test a graduate student’s comprehensive knowledge of fields related to her research and qualify her for a PhD candidacy.  Or, so I’m told.  After nine months of reading 285 books and articles, scheduling 60 hours of meetings, writing 261 pages of responses (roughly 117,450 words), I’ve finally made it to exam week. Three fields, three written exams, and one oral exam.  No problem.  Below is a photoblog recounting the process of exam week. 11/17 The Day Before the Exam Discovered some notes on Mumford from my first year!  I’m not really sure how to decipher […]

Liveblog: Environment, HASTS 25th Anniversary Event

Liveblog: Environment, HASTS 25th Anniversary Event

Co-written with Shreeharsh Kelkar, with additional help from Amy Johnson and photos by Ashawari Chaudhuri, Amy Johnson, and Lan Li. In her Welcome speech for the HASTS 25th Anniversary celebration, Deborah Fitzgerald started with a plea.  Working in the “belly of positivism,” it’s not easy being a science studies scholar at MIT.  But fortunately, we’ve been able to become the best–and only–program of our kind.  History, Anthropology, and STS. “The program was never quite tidy or quite tame,” and sometimes it still feels a bit unruly, always full of surprises. ***** The first panel, Environment, is chaired by Nicole Labruto and moderated by Nate Deshmukh Towery. Etienne […]